Art Spiegelman's Picks

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The Left Bank Gang

By Jason

Our Price: $6.50 - $11.65
An illustrated alternate-world tale in which graphic novels are a dominant form of fiction traces the careers of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, and James Joyce, who meet in a Parisian bar to discuss the particulars of their work, the achievements of graphic giants Dostoevsky and Faulkner, and the recommendations of such contemporaries as Gertrude Stein. Original.
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By the end of his life, Primo Levi had become increasingly convinced that the lessons of the Holocaust were destined to be lost as it took a place among the routine atrocities of history. This book is a dark meditation on the meaning of the Nazi extermination after the passing of forty years. 203p.
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Spiegelman's sinister and wild b&w drawings give charged new life to Joseph March's poem fable of dark Prohibition-era morality. A lost classic from 1928, 'It's the book that made me want to be a writer.' -- William Burroughs. 119p. Pap.
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Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend

By Winsor McCay

Our Price: $5.50 - $9.85
A reprinting of the first edition of Rarebit Fiend, a book so rare today that only two or three copies are known to exists. Zit is one of the most successful feats in comic strip history, with not only McCay’s remarkable draughtsmanship, but a freedom from the taboos that would later exist, an incredible anticipation of techniques that did not appear again for decades – bird’s-eye views, strange perspectives, and, of course, McCay’s wonderful imagination. The dreams are important for capturing the period, but they are also permanent creations that say much about rarebit dreams today. Sixty cartoon sequences; original title page and notes are reprinted unaltered from the 1905 edition. B&W illustrations. 62p.
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From the vogue for nubile models to the explosion in the juvenile crime rate, this modern classic of social history and media traces the precipitous decline of childhood in America today - and the corresponding threat to the notion of adulthood. Neil Postman, author of Technopoly, suggests that chldhood is a relatively recent invention, which came into being as the new medium of print imposed divisions between children and adults. But now these divisions are eroding under the barrage of television, which turns the adult secrets of sex and violence into popular entertainment and pitches both news and advertising at the intellectual level of ten-year-olds. Originally published in 1982. Notes, Bibliography, Index. 177p.
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