Infinite Jest

By ,

Infinite Jest Fiction
Our Price: $20.00

Product Description

Set in an addicts' halfway house and a tennis academy, and featuring one of the most endearingly dysfunctional families in contemporary fiction, 'Infinite Jets' explores essential questions about what entertainment is and why it has come to dominate our lives, about how our desire for entertainment affects our need to connect with other people, and about what the pleasures we choose say about who we are. While it reads equal parts philosophical quest and screwball comedy, in the novel, every rule of fiction comes under pressure to invent something beyond the merely new, big, and adventuresome. With 388 footnotes. 1,079p.

Editorial Reviews

With its baroque subplots, zany political satire, morbid, cerebral humor and astonishing range of cultural references, Wallace's brilliant but somewhat bloated dirigible of a second novel (after The Broom in the System) will appeal to steadfast readers of Pynchon and Gaddis. But few others will have the stamina for it. Set in an absurd yet uncanny near-future, with a cast of hundreds and close to 400 footnotes, Wallace's story weaves between two surprisingly similar locales: Ennet House, a halfway-house in the Boston Suburbs, and the adjacent Enfield Tennis Academy. It is the ``Year of the Depend Adult Undergarment'' (each calendar year is now subsidized by retail advertising); the U.S. and Canada have been subsumed by the Organization of North American Nations, unleashing a torrent of anti-O.N.A.N.ist terrorism by Quebecois separatists; drug problems are widespread; the Northeastern continent is a giant toxic waste dump; and CD-like ``entertainment cartridges'' are the prevalent leisure activity. The novel hinges on the dysfunctional family of E.T.A.'s founder, optical-scientist-turned-cult-filmmaker Dr. James Incandenza (aka Himself), who took his life shortly after producing a mysterious film called Infinite Jest, which is supposedly so addictively entertaining as to bring about a total neural meltdown in its viewer. As Himself's estranged sons?professional football punter Orin, introverted tennis star Hal and deformed naif Mario?come to terms with his suicide and legacy, they and the residents of Ennet House become enmeshed in the machinations of the wheelchair-bound leader of a Quebecois separatist faction, who hopes to disseminate cartridges of Infinite Jest and thus shred the social fabric of O.N.A.N. With its hilarious riffs on themes like addiction, 12-step programs, technology and waste management (in all its scatological implications), this tome is highly engrossing?in small doses. Yet the nebulous, resolutionless ending serves to underscore Wallace's underlying failure to find a suitable novelistic shape for his ingenious and often outrageously funny material. (Feb.) Copyright 1995 Cahners Business Information.

Customer Reviews

No customers have written a review yet, write the first!

You May Also Like These Items

  • Our Price: $8.00
  • Our Price: $8.00
  • Our Price: $16.20
  • Our Price: $14.40
  • Our Price: $7.50
  • Our Price: $7.95
  • Our Price: $8.95
  • Our Price: $16.95
  • Our Price: $6.95
  • Our Price: $19.80