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In both poetry and prose, the editors have chosen selections intended to give readers a clear sense of Rich's evolution and accomplishment. Many of the poems in this expanded collection are from Rich's five recent volumes—The Dream of a Common Language (1978), A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far (1981), Your Native Land, Your Life (1986), Time's Power: Poems 1985-1988 (1989), and An Atlas of the Difficult World (1991). Prose selections include "When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision," Rich's canonical statement on feminism; "Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence," on being a lesbian in a heterosexual world; Rich's interview for American Poetry Review, which presents a full and frank discussion of her work; and her previously unpublished commentary on the genesis of the poem "Yom Kippur 1984."The editors have also taken into account the many essays on Rich and reviews of her work that have been published since 1975. Some earlier biographical selections have been replaced with works that focus on the quality of Rich's writing and her place in twentieth-century American literature—not just as a poet, but as a woman, a lesbian, and a mother. Criticism includes thirteen reviews and interpretations of Rich's work by W. H. Auden, John Ashbery, Margaret Atwood, Helen Vendler, Judith McDaniel, Adrian Oktenberg, Charles Altieri, and Joanna Feit Diehl, among others. A second recent study by Albert Gelpi traces the events in Rich's life from which her work evolves. An updated Chronology and Selected Bibliography, as well as an expanded Index, are included.
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An anthology of contemporary poets presents works that reflect the diversity in American poetry
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Copper Canyon Press brings readers the definitive volume of June Jordan's poetry with this retrospective edited by Jan Heller Levi and Sara Miles. Gathering together work from her ten books of poetry and including many-never-before-published poems- including a tender, fierce, and innovative collection of poems written before her death, in 2002, from breast cancer, this is a fitting tribute to a groundbreaker of verse.
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"I came to explore the wreck. / The words are purposes. / The words are maps. / I came to see the damage that was done / and the treasures that prevail." These provocative poems move with the power of Rich's distinctive voice.
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Drawing upon 12 volumes of her published work as well as a manuscript posthumously left behind, this collection from the award-winning poet includes “From Strata,” “Itinerary,” “For the Young Anarchists” and “Theethsucking Bird.”
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The critically acclaimed, award-winning poet offers a new collection of poems that challenge many aspects of society while presenting her views on the world as it nears the end of the millennium.
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Adrienne Rich's influential and landmark investigation concerns both the experience and the institution of motherhood.
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At issue are the politics of language; the uses of scholarship; and the topics of racism, history, and motherhood among others called forth by Rich as "part of the effort to define a female consciousness which is political, aesthetic, and erotic, and which refuses to be included or contained in the culture of passivity."
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Adrienne Rich suggests how poetry has actually been lived in the world, past and present. In this essay, which was the basis for her speech upon accepting the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, she ranges among themes including poetry's disparagement as "either immoral or unprofitable," the politics of translation, how poetry enters into extreme situations, different poetries as conversations across place and time. In its openness to many voices, Poetry and Commitment offers a perspective on poetry in an ever more divided and violent world.
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One of the most gifted and unique poets writing in America today, Adrienne Rich's work has come to define the revolutionary spirit that exists within us all. In this book, her most unpredictable and diverse collection to date, readers are again introduced to the vibrant and occasionally violent Rich as she masterfully dissects and reorganizes the events of everyday life. From the incantations of 'Behind the Motel' to the urgency that permeates the title poem, 'Telephone Ringing in the Labyrinth' sees one of our finest authors writing at her most lyrical and powerful. Rich was awarded the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution of American Letters in 2006.
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In this collection of poems, Adrienne Rich reeturns to the musical influences that encouraged her to start writing poetry at a very young age: music, blues refrains, improvisations and the sound of birdsong. Notes on the Poems. 108p.
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Anne Bradstreet, the first true poet in the American colonies, wrote at a time and in a place where any literary creation was rare and difficult and that of a woman more unusual still. Born in England and brought up in the household of the Earl of Lincoln where her father, Thomas Dudley, was steward, Anne Bradstreet sailed to Massachusetts Bay in 1630, shortly after her marriage at sixteen to Simon Bradstreet. For the next forty years she lived in the New England wilderness, raising a family of eight, combating sickness and hardship, and writing the verse that made her, as the poet Adrienne Rich says in her Foreword to this edition, "the first non-didactic American poet, the first to give an embodiment to American nature, the first in whom personal intention appears to precede Puritan dogma as an impulse to verse."All Anne Bradstreet's extant poetry and prose is published here with modernized spelling and punctuation. This volume reproduces the second edition of Several Poems, brought out in Boston in 1678, as well as the contents of a manuscript first printed in 1857. Adrienne Rich's Foreword offers a sensitive and illuminating critique of Anne Bradstreet both as a person and as a writer, and the Introduction, scholarly notes, and appendices by Jeannine Hensley make this an authoritative edition.Adrienne Rich observes, "Intellectual intensity among women gave cause for uneasiness" at this period--a fact borne out by the lines in the Prologue to the early poems: "I am obnoxious to each carping tongue/ Who says my hand a needle better fits." The broad scope of Anne Bradstreet's own learning and reading is most evident in the literary and historical allusions of The Tenth Muse, the first edition of her poems, published in London in 1650. Her later verse and her prose meditations strike a more personal note, however, and reveal both a passionate religious sense and a depth of feeling for her husband, her children, the fears and disappointments she constantly faced, and the consoling power of nature. Imbued with a Puritan striving to turn all events to the glory of God, these writings bear the mark of a woman of strong spirit, charm, delicacy, and wit: in their intimate and meditative quality Anne Bradstreet is established as a poet of sensibility and permanent stature.
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A landmark anthology of poetry by the distinguished award-winning poet offers a visionary exploration of the power of time--memory and its contradictions, life and death, parent-child relationships, and the meaning of human responsiblity
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Drawing on her journals, letters, dreams, memories, and careful readings of many poets, the award-winning poet reflects on the influence of literature on American life and politics today. By the author of An Atlas of the Difficult World.
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(1971). 8vo. 1st edition. Some rubbing to cloth with fading to edges. Substantial rubbing and wear to dust jacket with few chips to extremities. VG/VG.
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