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This second of the six Chronicles of Barsetshire continues the moral comedy, at the center of which is Mr. Harding and his daughter Eleanor, and adding to the cast Mr. Slope, Dr. Proudie, and the Stanhopes.279p.
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As a scandalized Victorian society looks on, Alice Vavasor, Lady Glencora, and the Widow Greenow continue their romantic entanglements with disreputable suitors
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The Reverend Marfk Robarts, vicar of Framley, seems to unite all the blessings of a happy life. But all of it is put in jeopardy wgeb he becomes financially entangled with an unscrupulous M.P., and his future becomes less bright. The fourth in Anthony Trollope's 'Barset' series of novels, FRAMLEY PARSONAGE is a delightful story of love and money in 19th-century England. 574p.
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The Small House at Allington is the fifth book in Anthony Trollope’s Barchester series. As with all of Trollope's work, it is beautifully written and draws the reader into its many interwoven tales. Engaged to the ambitious and self-serving Adolphus Crosbie, Lily Dale is devastated when he jilts her for the aristocratic Lady Alexandrina. Although crushed by his faithlessness, Lily still believes she is bound to her unworthy former fiance for life and therefore condemned to remain single after his betrayal. And when a more deserving suitor pays his addresses, she is unable to see past her feelings for Crosbie. Written when Trollope was at the height of his popularity, The Small House at Allington contains his most admired heroine in Lily Dale, a young woman of independent spirit who nonetheless longs to be loved.
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After being installed as Prime Minister in Victorian England, Plantagenet Palliser finds himself uniquely ill-suited for the office.
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Can a morally scrupulous English gentleman make an effective Prime Minister? This is one of the enduringly fascinating problems posed in The Prime Minister (1876). And as Plantaganet Palliser, Duke of Omnium, overenthusiastically supported by Lady Glencora, presides over the Coalition government, Trollope reaches into the highest echelons of the English establishment, depicting political realities rather than ideology, portraying social, sexual and domestic politics as well as the public variety.The world of the novel is perplexed and dominated by the handsome impostor Ferdinand Lopez. Even the Duke and Duchess are not immune to his malign influence, as Lopez pursues Emily Wharton for her charm and her fortune, and plots to win membership of that most exclusive of English clubs, the Houses of Parliament.
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(Penguin Classics). First published in 1874. Recognized as Trollope's masterpiece, the novel is a brilliantly achieved fictional expose of 'a world increasingly more congenial to the speculator, encompassing the milieu of New York City's financial institutions, London's exclusive West End squares, and drones' clubs populated by languorous aristocrats, all target for the unscrupulous speculator, both in the money market and marriage. 779p. Pap.
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