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(Everyman Millennium Library). First published in 1864-65. In the first volume in what turned out to be the Palliser sequence of six political novels, readers first meet Plantagenet Palliser, LadyGlencora, and Alice Vavasor. 447p.
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As a scandalized Victorian society looks on, Alice Vavasor, Lady Glencora, and the Widow Greenow continue their romantic entanglements with disreputable suitors
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(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)
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Trollope singled out Orely Farm for its successful combination of realistic and sensational effects which he felt to be the highest achievement of the novelist. The novel centers on a case of forgery and the anguish, guilt, and pathos of the central character, Lady Mason. Youthful marriage choices, middle-aged miarital crisis, and the moving love and loss of an elderly man revolve around the legal action and the complex portrayal of Lady Mason, who is both sympathetic and wily. The novel poses a standard of morality higher than that embodied in the practice of an English court of law. 421p.
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The third in Trollope's six-volume Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds boasts an extraordinary heroine in Lizzie Eustace, a lying schemer in the mould of Thackeray's Becky Sharp. A pompous Under-Secretary of State, an exploitative and acquisitive American and her unhappy "niece," a shady radical peer, and a brutal aristocrat are only some of the characters in this, one of Trollope's most engaging novels: part sensation fiction, part detective story, part political satire, and part ironic romance. It is also a highly revealing study of Victorian Britain, its colonial activities in Ireland and India, its veneration of wealth, and its pervasive dishonesty. In her introduction, Helen Small explores the central themes of lying and truth-telling, placing the novel within contemporary political and social debates. An invaluable appendix outlines the political context of the Palliser novels and establishes the internal chronology of the series and the relationship between fictional and actual political events, providing a unique understanding of the series as a linked narrative. In addition, the book includes a compact biography of Trollope and a wealth of explanatory notes.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
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Can a morally scrupulous English gentleman make an effective Prime Minister? This is one of the enduringly fascinating problems posed in The Prime Minister (1876). And as Plantaganet Palliser, Duke of Omnium, overenthusiastically supported by Lady Glencora, presides over the Coalition government, Trollope reaches into the highest echelons of the English establishment, depicting political realities rather than ideology, portraying social, sexual and domestic politics as well as the public variety.The world of the novel is perplexed and dominated by the handsome impostor Ferdinand Lopez. Even the Duke and Duchess are not immune to his malign influence, as Lopez pursues Emily Wharton for her charm and her fortune, and plots to win membership of that most exclusive of English clubs, the Houses of Parliament.
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After being installed as Prime Minister in Victorian England, Plantagenet Palliser finds himself uniquely ill-suited for the office.
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Lily Dale is courted by two young men of widely-differing social backgrounds in this mid-nineteenth-century novel, set in Trollope's imaginary Barsetshire
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(Penguin Classics). First published in 1874. Recognized as Trollope's masterpiece, the novel is a brilliantly achieved fictional expose of 'a world increasingly more congenial to the speculator, encompassing the milieu of New York City's financial institutions, London's exclusive West End squares, and drones' clubs populated by languorous aristocrats, all target for the unscrupulous speculator, both in the money market and marriage. 779p. Pap.
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