History - Latin American

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  • '68

    By Paco Taibo

    Our Price: $16.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781583226087
    • Publisher: SEVEN STONES PRESS
    • Published: October 2003
    In Mexico City on the night of October 2, 1968, at least two hundred students - among thousands protesting election fraud and campaigning for university reform - were shot dead in a bloody showdown with government troops in Tlatelolco Square. Hundreds more were arrested, and imprisoned for years. Yet these events are nowhere to be found in official histories: that very night the bodies were collected and trucked away and the cobblestones washed clean, and government denial of all involvement began. To this day no one has been held accountable for the official acts of savagery.One member of the crowd that night, Paco Taibo, would become an international literary figure; '68 is his account of the events of October 2, and of the student movement that preceded them, available for the first time in English, with a new epilogue by the author. In provocative, anecdotal prose, Taibo here claims for history "one more of the many unredeemed and sleepless ghosts that live in our lands."
  • 'One Hell of a Gamble': Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-1964

    By Aleksandr Fursenko

    Our Price: $20.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780393040708
    • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Co., Inc.
    • Published: June 1997
    Provides an account of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War--the Cuban Missile Crisis
  • 1808: The Flight of the Emperor: How a Weak Prince, a Mad Queen, and the British Navy Tricked Napoleon and Changed the New World

    By Laurentino Gomes

    Our Price: $28.95
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780762787968
    • Publisher: Lyons Press
    • Published: September 2013
    In a time of terror for Europe’s monarchs--imprisoned, exiled, executed--Napoleon’s army marched toward Lisbon. Cornered, Prince Regent João had to make the most fraught decision of his life. Protected by the British Navy, he fled to Brazil with his entire family, including his mentally ill mother, most of the nobility, and the entire state apparatus. Thousands made the voyage, but it was no luxury cruise. It took two months in cramped, decrepit ships. Sickness ran rampant. Lice infested some of the vessels, and noble women had to shave their hair and grease their bald heads with antiseptic sulfur. Vermin infested the food, and bacteria contaminated the drinking water. No European monarch had ever set foot in the Americas, let alone relocating an entire court there. A week after landing, Prince João opened Brazil’s ports, liberating the colony from a trade monopoly with Portugal. While explorers mapped the burgeoning nation’s distant regions, the prince authorized the construction of roads, the founding of schools, and the creation of factories, raising Brazil to kingdom status in 1815. Meanwhile, under French control, Portugal was suffering the dire effects of famine and war. Never had the country lost so many people in so little time. But after Napoleon’s fall and over a decade of misery, the Portuguese demanded the return of their king. João sailed back in tears, but because of him Brazil remained whole and powerful. As he left, the last chapter of colonial Brazil drew to a close, setting the stage for the strong, independent nation that we know today, changing the history of the New World forever.
  • The 1812 Aponte Rebellion in Cuba And the Struggle Against Atlantic Slavery

    By Matt D. Childs

    Our Price: $32.50
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780807857724
    • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Pr
    • Published: November 2006
  • 2000 Years of Mayan Literature

    By Dennis Tedlock

    Our Price: $31.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780520271371
    • Publisher: Univ of California Pr
    • Published: November 2011
    "Never before has anyone focused so successfully on the literary genius of these ancient authors. Tedlock is so much more than a translator, placing selected Mayan works in a continuous narrative that skillfully links authors from the third century to the sixteenth century with writers of today. An extremely important, original, and innovative work."--Martha J. Macri, coauthor of The New Catalog of Maya Hieroglyphs, Volumes 1 and 2, and Director of the Maya Hieroglyphic Database Project, University of California, Davis "A stunning recreation of the intellectual world of the ancient Maya, the only fully literate people of pre-Columbian America. Informed by the latest research on Maya hieroglyphic writing, art, and mythology, this beautifully illustrated and wonderfully readable work by an outstanding scholar should be on the bookshelf of all those interested in this fascinating civilization."--Michael Coe, author of Breaking the Maya Code "This book is, like the ancient Maya texts and images it explores, a work of art."--David Freidel, co-author (with Linda Schele and Joy Parker) of Maya Cosmos: Three Thousand Years on the Shaman's Path "Literally breathtaking. A truly unprecedented gathering and translation of written Mayan texts. Tedlock is making visible, for the first time, a Mayan literature in comprehensible, meaningful form.""--Jerome Rothenberg, poet, author/editor of Technicians of the Sacred and Poems for the Millennium
  • The 33: Deep Down Dark - The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free

    By Héctor Tobar

    Our Price: $8.00
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781250088949
    • Publisher: Picador
    • Published: October 2015
    Includes New Material Exclusive to the PaperbackA Finalist for a National Book Critics Circle AwardA Finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book PrizeA New York Times Book Review Notable BookSelected for NPR's Morning Edition Book Club When the San José mine collapsed outside of Copiapó, Chile, in August 2010, it trapped thirty-three miners beneath thousands of feet of rock for a record-breaking sixty-nine days. After the disaster, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Héctor Tobar received exclusive access to the miners and their tales, and in Deep Down Dark, he brings them to haunting, visceral life. We learn what it was like to be imprisoned inside a mountain, understand the horror of being slowly consumed by hunger, and experience the awe of working in such a place-underground passages filled with danger and that often felt alive. A masterwork of narrative journalism and a stirring testament to the power of the human spirit,Deep Down Dark captures the profound ways in which the lives of everyone involved in the catastrophe were forever changed.
  • AIDS in Latin America

    By T. Frasca

    Our Price: $32.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9781403969446
    • Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
  • Abolition of Slavery In Brazil

    By David Baronov

    Our Price: $86.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780313312427
    • Publisher: GREENWOOD PUBLISHING GROUP
    • Published: June 2000
    Liberation of Africans through the emancipation of capital.
  • The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoir

    By Fernando Henrique Cardoso

    Our Price: $7.50
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781586484293
    • Publisher: Public Affairs
    • Published: March 2007
    Presents a memoir of the former Brazilian president, who discusses the complex history of his country, the political, social, and economic obstacles he encountered in his efforts to modernize it, and his successes in bringing about stability and prosperity.
  • Account of the Fables and Rites of the Incas

    By Cristobal De Molina

    Our Price: $19.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780292743984
    • Publisher: Univ of Texas Pr
    • Published: May 2012
  • Addicted to Failure

    By Brian Loveman

    Our Price: $88.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780742540972
    • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
    • Published: September 2006
  • Adios Nino

    By Deborah T. Levenson

    Our Price: $23.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780822353157
    • Publisher: Duke Univ Pr
    • Published: April 2013
    In Adiós Niño: The Gangs of Guatemala City and the Politics of Death, Deborah T. Levenson examines transformations in the Guatemalan gangs called Maras from their emergence in the 1980s to the early 2000s. A historical study, Adiós Niño describes how fragile spaces of friendship and exploration turned into rigid and violent ones in which youth, and especially young men, came to employ death as a natural way of living for the short period that they expected to survive. Levenson relates the stark changes in the Maras to global, national, and urban deterioration; transregional gangs that intersect with the drug trade; and the Guatemalan military's obliteration of radical popular movements and of social imaginaries of solidarity. Part of Guatemala City's reconfigured social, political, and cultural milieu, with their members often trapped in Guatemala's growing prison system, the gangs are used to justify remilitarization in Guatemala's contemporary postwar, post-peace era. Portraying the Maras as microcosms of broader tragedies, and pointing out the difficulties faced by those youth who seek to escape the gangs, Levenson poses important questions about the relationship between trauma, memory, and historical agency.
  • An Affair Of Honor: Woodrow Wilson And The Occupation Of Veracruz

    By R.E. Quirk

    Our Price: $18.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780393003901
    • Publisher: W. W. Norton and Company, Inc.
    • Published: January 1967
  • African Roots, Brazilian Rites: Cultural and National Identity in Brazil

    By Cheryl Sterling

    Our Price: $100.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9781137009999
    • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
    • Published: September 2012
    Questions of Africanness and blackness rim the Afro-Brazilian sphere of interaction. What is Africa? How is it constructed by Afro-Brazilians? What do these constructions accomplish? How are they reflected in the national character? And how do these constructs lend themselves to ideations of blackness? In fact, what exactly is blackness, given that Brazil is a hybrid nation in both its ethnic composition and cultural modalities? This book examines the field cultural and racial representation by Afro-Brazilians in Candomblé culture, public rituals, carnival, plays, poetry and hip-hop videography, to reposition Afro-Brazilians in the framework of Brazil's social and political processes.
  • African Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean

    By Herbert S. Klein

    Our Price: $29.75
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780195189421
    • Publisher: Oxford Univ Pr
    • Published: September 2007
    This is an original survey of the economic and social history of slavery of the Afro-American experience in Latin America and the Caribbean. The focus of the book is on the Portuguese, Spanish, and French-speaking regions of continental America and the Caribbean. It analyzes the latest research on urban and rural slavery and on the African and Afro-American experience under these regimes. It approaches these themes both historically and structurally. The historical section provides a detailed analysis of the evolution of slavery and forced labor systems in Europe, Africa, and America. The second half of the book looks at the type of life and culture which the salves experienced in these American regimes.The first part of the book describes the growth of the plantation and mining economies that absorbed African slave labor, how that labor was used, and how the changing international economic conditions affected the local use and distribution of the slave labor force. Particular emphasis is given to the evolution of the sugar plantation economy, which was the single largest user of African slave labor and which was established in almost all of the Latin American colonies.Once establishing the economic context in which slave labor was applied, the book shifts focus to the Africans and Afro-Americans themselves as they passed through this slave regime. The first part deals with the demographic history of the slaves, including their experience in the Atlantic slave trade and their expectations of life in the New World. The next part deals with the attempts of the African and American born slaves to create a viable and autonomous culture. This includes their adaptation of European languages, religions, and even kinship systems to their own needs. It also examines systems of cooptation and accommodation to the slave regime, as well as the type and intensity of slave resistances and rebellions.A separate chapter is devoted to the important and different role of the free colored under slavery in the various colonies. The unique importance of the Brazilian free labor class is stressed, just as is the very unusual mobility experienced by the free colored in the French West Indies.The final chapter deals with the differing history of total emancipation and how ex-slaves adjusted to free conditions in the post-abolition periods of their respective societies. The patterns of post-emancipation integration are studied along with the questions of the relative success of the ex-slaves in obtaining control over land and escape from the old plantation regimes.

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