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Drawn from letters submitted to the popular advice column of The Forward, a widely read Yiddish language newspaper begun in 1906 New York, this illustrative tribute to the turn-of-the-century Jewish immigrants who transformed New York City offers insight into a segment of America's rich cultural past. Original. 15,000 first printing.
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Ample Hills Creamery is an ice-cream destination that attracts thousands of customers each day from near and far to Prospect Heights, Brooklyn. Lines wind around the block, spurred on by the chance to try one of their unforget­table flavors, and these and countless others will be dreamed up in kitchens across the country with the help of Ample Hills Creamery. Featuring recipes for the most sought-after flavors?including Salted Crack Caramel, Ooey Gooey, and the Munchies?the book is organized by mood. Are you feeling nostalgic? Try a scoop of Black Cow Float. Or maybe you need a drink? Daddy’s Sundae, made with bourbon, will set you right. For kids and kids-at-heart, stories, activities, and hand-drawn characters appear throughout each chapter, offering games, helpful tips, and inspiration for creating new flavors. With mouthwatering photography and charming illustrations, Ample Hills Creamery is a definitive, cow-filled guide to making exceptionally delicious ice cream at home.
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"The countercultures that came to define bohemia spanned the Atlantic, from Walt Whitman to Josephine Baker, and from Gertrude Stein to Thelonious Monk. Bohemians is the graphic history of this movement and its illustrious figures, recovering the utopianideas behind millennial communities, the rise of Greenwich Village and Harlem, the multiracial and radical jazz and dance worlds, and West Coast, Southern, and Midwest bohemias, among other scenes. Drawn by an all-star cast of comics artists, Bohemians is a broad and entertaining account of the rebel impulse in American cultural history"--
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From the watery gruel of "Oliver Twist" to the seductive cupcakes from "The Corrections," photographic interpretations of culinary moments from contemporary and classic literature are partnered with text from the book that inspired its creation.
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A first volume of a series detailing the life and work of the influential political advocate draws on private papers and other untapped sources to cover his birth in 1869 through his upbringing in Gujarat, discussing his London education and decades as a lawyer in South Africa. 35,000 first printing.
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This first biography of the English painter and grandson of Sigmund Freud traces the life of this extraordinary artist who painted everyone from Kate Moss to Queen Elizabeth and whose intent was always to find and reveal the character hidden within by means of his intense visual imagination.
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Illustrated with simple black and white drawings throughout, this guide to the city that never sleeps reveals the secrets and unwritten rules for living in and visiting New York. Original. 15,000 first printing.
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From the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Inside of a Dog, this “elegant and entertaining” (The Boston Globe) explanation of how humans perceive their environments “does more than open our eyes...opens our hearts and minds, too, gently awakening us to a world—in fact, many worlds—we’ve been missing” (USA TODAY).Alexandra Horowitz shows us how to see the spectacle of the ordinary—to practice, as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle put it, “the observation of trifles.” Structured around a series of eleven walks the author takes, mostly in her Manhattan neighborhood, On Looking features experts on a diverse range of subjects, including an urban sociologist, the well-known artist Maira Kalman, a geologist, a physician, and a sound designer. Horowitz also walks with a child and a dog to see the world as they perceive it. What they see, how they see it, and why most of us do not see the same things reveal the startling power of human attention and the cognitive aspects of what it means to be an expert observer. Page by page, Horowitz shows how much more there is to see—if only we would really look. Trained as a cognitive scientist, she discovers a feast of fascinating detail, all explained with her generous humor and self-deprecating tone. So turn off the phone and other electronic devices and be in the real world—where strangers communicate by geometry as they walk toward one another, where sounds reveal shadows, where posture can display humility, and the underside of a leaf unveils a Lilliputian universe—where, indeed, there are worlds within worlds within worlds.
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Songs Only You Know begins when Sean is 18 and spans a dark decade when his father succumbs to crack addiction, his parents' marriage crumbles, and his younger sister spirals into a fatal depression. Sean's salvation is music. His refuge is the stage. Slumming in the trenches as a low-rent musician coincides with the worst years of his family's life, yet his wayward rock band mates serve as a surrogate family and, in a way, the gravity and darkness of his personal life folds into the humor and misadventure found in a parallel world that exposes his "secret life" as a musician. Ultimately, however, by coming so near to the fates of his lost kin, Sean is forced to confront what has happened, as well as himself.Fierce. Vivid. Brave. Songs Only You Know cuts to the bone. Sean and his family's all-too-human frailties resonate long after the book is finished. Despite devastating odds, their story inspires and offers promise of transformation.
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"In J.M.Coetzee's stunning translation: a powerfully symbolic story in the voice of a slave that explores the depths of imagination, isolation, fear, and love. A slave woman is the only survivor of a failed expedition into the depths of Southern Africa. She shelters in the hollow trunk of a baobab tree where she relives her earlier existence in a state of increasing isolation. We are the sole witnesses to her moving history: her capture as a young child, her life in a harbor city on the eastern coast as servant to various masters, her journey with her last owner and protector, and her life in the baobab tree"--
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Learning that he may be the heir to the unclaimed estate of an English World War I officer, American college graduate Tristan Campbell is required to find documentation proving his heritage during breakneck visits to the London archives, Somme battlefields and Icelandic Eastfjords. A first novel.
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"A powerful and provocative exploration of how war has changed our society--for the better "War! What is it good for? Absolutely nothing," says the famous song--but archaeology, history, and biology show that war in fact has been good for something. Surprising as it sounds, war has made humanity safer and richer. In War! What Is It Good For? the renowned historian and archaeologist Ian Morris tells the gruesome, gripping story of fifteen thousand years of war, going behind the battles and brutality to reveal what war has really done to and for the world. Stone Age people lived in small, feuding societies and stood a one-in-ten or even one-in-five chance of dying violently. In the twentieth century, by contrast--despite two world wars, Hiroshima, and the Holocaust--fewer than one person in a hundred died violently. The explanation: war, and war alone, has created bigger, more complex societies, ruled by governments that have stamped out internal violence. Strangely enough, killing has made the world safer, and the safety it has produced has allowed people to make the world richer too. War has been history's greatest paradox, but this searching study of fifteen centuries of violence suggests that the next half century is going to be the most dangerous of all time. If we can survive it, the age-old dream of ending war may yet come to pass. But, Morris argues, only if we understand what war has been good for can we know where it will take us next"--
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