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In Real Life

By Cory Doctorow

Our Price: $9.00 - $17.99
Anda loves Coarsegold Online, the massively-multiplayer role playing game that she spends most of her free time on. It's a place where she can be a leader, a fighter, a hero. It's a place where she can meet people from all over the world, and make friends. Gaming is, for Anda, entirely a good thing. But things become a lot more complicated when Anda befriends a gold farmer -- a poor Chinese kid whose avatar in the game illegally collects valuable objects and then sells them to players from developed countries with money to burn. This behavior is strictly against the rules in Coarsegold, but Anda soon comes to realize that questions of right and wrong are a lot less straightforward when a real person's real livelihood is at stake. From acclaimed teen author Cory Doctorow and rising star cartoonist Jen Wang, In Real Life is a sensitive, thoughtful look at adolescence, gaming, poverty, and culture-clash.
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The Emmy Award-nominated former talk-show host and New York Times columnist draws on his extensive career to share reflections and reminiscences about Hollywood legends, American cultural icons and everyday absurdities.
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The Forgers

By Bradford Morrow

Our Price: $12.00 - $24.00
The murderer of Adam Diehl, a reclusive rare-book collector, begins to stalk Adam's sister's lover--Will, a convicted literary forger--under the guise of letters from long-dead authors, and soon Will realizes that this killer threatens everything he holds dear. 20,000 first printing.
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In this ceaselessly questioning book, acclaimed African American dancer, choreographer, and director Bill T. Jones reflects on his art and life as he describes the genesis of Story/Time, a recent dance work produced by his company and inspired by the modernist composer and performer John Cage. Presenting personally revealing stories, richly illustrated with striking color photographs of the work's original stage production, and featuring a beautiful, large-format design, the book is a work of art in itself.Like the dance work, Story/Time the book is filled with telling vignettes--about Jones's childhood as part of a large, poor, Southern family that migrated to upstate New York; about his struggles to find a place for himself in a white-dominated dance world; and about his encounters with notable artists and musicians. In particular, Jones examines his ambivalent attraction to avant-garde modernism, which he finds liberating but also limiting in its disregard for audience response. As he strives to make his work more personal and broadly engaging, especially to an elusive African American audience, Jones--who is still drawn to the avant-garde--wrestles with questions of how an artist can remain true to himself while still caring about the popular reception of his work. A provocative meditation on the demands and rewards of artistic creation, Story/Time is an inspiring and enlightening portrait of the life and work of one of the great artists of our time.
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John Cohen was a founding member of the New Lost City Ramblers, one of the folk revival's most authentic and respected musical groups. In the 1960s he made a series of photographs of the last years of Woody Guthrie's life, and early portraits of Bob Dylan on his arrival in New York, depicting two titans of American music at opposite ends of their careers. In the process, Cohen portrayed one of the great moments of American folk music history. The book contains other images from the 1960s including the music scenes at Washington Square and on MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village, images of Jerry Garcia and the musicians in San Francisco's "Family Dog," as well as the psychedelic "Sky River Rock" festival. In 1970, Dylan requested Cohen make another set of color photographs of him with a "camera that could take photographs from a block away." By then, he had become world-famous. Bob was seen walking unrecognized on the streets of the city and at a farm in upstate NY. The photographs were used in Dylan's album "Self Portrait."
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Sea Change

By Jorie Graham

Out of Stock
A new volume by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Dream of the Unified Field and The End of Beauty explores a metaphorical threshold at which civilization as it is known becomes unsustainable in the face of unrealized passions, regrets, and limited prospects. Original.
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"In December 1992, three groups of teenagers head to the theater to see the movie version of the famed Eons & Empires comic books. For Adam it's a last ditch effort to connect with something (actually, someone, the girl he's had a crush on for years) in his sleepy Florida town before he leaves for good. Passionate fan Sharon skips school in Cincinnati so she can fully appreciate the flick without interruption from her vapid almost-friends--a seemingly silly indiscretion with shocking consequences. And insuburban Chicago, Phoebe and Ollie simply want to have a nice first date and maybe fool around in the dark, if everyone they know could just stop getting in the way. Over the next two decades, these unforgettable characters criss-cross the globe, becoming entwined by friendship, sex, ambition, fame and tragedy. A razor-sharp, darkly comic page-turner, In Some Other World, Maybe sheds light on what it means to grow up in modern America"--
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From the acclaimed author of the international best seller Einstein’s Dreams, here is a lyrical memoir of Memphis from the 1930s through the 1960s: the music and the racism, the early days of the movies, and a powerful grandfather whose ghost continues to haunt the family. Alan Lightman’s grandfather M.A. Lightman was the family’s undisputed patriarch: it was his movie theater empire that catapulted the family to prominence in the South; his fearless success that both galvanized and paralyzed his descendants, haunting them for a half century after his death. In this lyrical and impressionistic memoir, Lightman writes about returning to Memphis in an attempt to understand the people he so eagerly left behind forty years earlier. As aging uncles and aunts begin telling family stories, Lightman rediscovers his southern roots and slowly realizes the errors in his perceptions of his grandfather and of his own father, who had been crushed by M.A. Here is a family saga set against a throbbing century of Memphis—the rhythm and blues, the barbecue and pecan pie, and the segregated society—that includes personal encounters with Elvis, Martin Luther King, Jr., and E. H. “Boss” Crump. At the heart of it all is a family haunted by the ghost of the domineering M.A., and the struggle of the author to understand his conflicted loyalties to his father and grandfather.(With black-and-white illustrations throughout.)
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Missing Reels

By Farran Smith Nehme

Our Price: $26.95
"New York in the late 1980s. Ceinwen Reilly has just moved from Yazoo City, Mississippi, and she's never going back, minimum wage job (vintage store salesgirl) and shabby apartment (Avenue C walkup) be damned. Who cares about earthly matters when Ceinwencan spend her days and her nights at the repertory houses--and most of the time that's left trying to look like Jean Harlow? One day, Ceinwen discovers that her downstairs neighbor may have--just possibly--starred in a forgotten silent film that hasn't been seen for ages. So naturally, it's time for a quest. She will track down the missing reels, she will impress her neighbor, and she will become a part of movie history: the archivist as inge. As she embarks on her grand mission, Ceinwen meets a somewhatbumbling, very charming 100% English math professor named Matthew, who is as rational as she is dreamy. Together, they will or will not discover the missing reels, will or will not fall in love, and will or will not encounter the obsessives that make up the New York silent film nut underworld. A novel as winning and energetic as the grand Hollywood films that inspired it, Missing Reels is an irresistible, alchemical mix of Nora Ephron and David Nicholls that will charm and delight"--
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No money? No problem. You can start packing your bags for that trip you’ve been dreaming a lifetime about. For more than half a decade, Matt Kepnes (aka Nomadic Matt) has been showing readers of his enormously popular travel blog that traveling isn’t expensive and that it’s affordable to all. He proves that as long as you think out of the box and travel like locals, your trip doesn’t have to break your bank, nor do you need to give up luxury. How to Travel the World on $50 a Day reveals Nomadic Matt’s tips, tricks, and secrets to comfortable budget travel based on his experience traveling the world without giving up the sushi meals and comfortable beds he enjoys. Offering a blend of advice ranging from travel hacking to smart banking, you’ll learn how to: * Avoid paying bank fees anywhere in the world * Earn thousands of free frequent flyer points * Find discount travel cards that can save on hostels, tours, and transportation * Get cheap (or free) plane tickets Whether it’s a two-week, two-month, or two-year trip, Nomadic Matt shows you how to stretch your money further so you can travel cheaper, smarter, and longer.
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THE COOLEST STREET STYLE CAPTURED BY REFINERY 29 Get set to build your best ever wardrobe featuring the hardest-working looks from around the globe with Refinery29—the world’s leading style destination—as their editors break down the essentials of the everyday chic, straight from the street. What transforms a look from on-trend to trendsetting? Editor-in-Chief Christene Barberich and Executive Creative Director Piera Gelardi deconstruct their favorite outfits to reveal what trailblazing looks like on the real-life fashion front, including: • HOW TO WEAR modern metallics, mixed prints, everyday ladylike, tomboy chic, lots of layers, and more. • CLEVER TIPS such as wearing one piece in three fresh ways, building blocks for discovering your own signature style, and updating your closet each season. • AND A ZOOM LENS on all the details and accessories that totally make the look. Featuring the fashion world’s coolest tastemakers, designers, stylists, and editors, these fearless iconoclasts challenge conventions and inspire a whole new generation of women to dress for themselves and discover their true inner style stars...just like YOU.
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"A gutsy, wise memoir-in-essays from a writer praised as "impossible to put down" (People) As an aspiring young writer in San Francisco, Michelle Tea lived in a scuzzy communal house; she drank, smoked, snorted anything she got her hands on; she toiled for the minimum wage; and she dated men and women, and sometimes both at once. But between hangovers and dead-end jobs, she scrawled in notebooks and organized dive bar poetry readings, working to make her literary dreams real. In How to Grow Up, Tea shares her awkward stumble towards the life of a Bonafide Grown-Up: healthy, responsible, self-aware, stable. She writes about passion, about her fraught relationship with money, about adoring Barney's while shopping at thrift stores, about breakups and the fertile ground between relationships, about roommates and rent, and about being superstitious ("why not, it imbues this harsh world of ours with a bit of magic.") At once heartwarming and darkly comic, How to Grow Up proves that the road less traveledmay be a difficult one, but if you embrace life's uncertainty and dust yourself off after every screw up, slowly but surely you just might make it to adulthood. "--
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"Chandler never wrote an autobiography or a memoir. Now Barry Day, making use of Chandler's novels, short stories, and letters as well as Day's always illuminating commentary, gives us the life of "the man with no home," a man precariously balanced between his classical English education with its immutable values and that of a fast-evolving America during the years before the Great War, with its resulting changing vernacular. Through his fiction and letters, brilliantly woven together, Chandler reveals what it was like to be a writer, and in particular what it was to be a writer of "hard-boiled" fiction in what was for him "another language." Along the way, he discusses the work of his contemporaries: Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Agatha Christie, Erle Stanley Gardner, Somerset Maugham, among others. Here is Chandler's Los Angeles, a city he adopted and which adopted him in the post-World War I period...Chandler on his Hollywood, working with Billy Wilder, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, and others...Chandler...organized crime and on his alter ego, Philip Marlowe, private eye, the incorruptible knight with little armour who walks the "mean streets" in a world not made for knights...on drinking (his life in the end was in a race with alcohol--and loneliness)...and here are Chandler's women--the Little Sisters; the dames--in his fiction--and his life"--
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