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Literary nonfiction. Adrian was deployed two times to Afghanistan, first as an executive officer and then as a captain skirmishing with Taliban forces. Throughout his time overseas, he wrote letters to friends, fellow soldiers, and his family. Showing vulnerability to some and steadfastness to others, these letters form AFGHAN POST and chronicle his identity as it splinters under the strain of modern warfare. This epistolary memoir is a daring look into the mind and experiences of an Afghanistan war veteran. Its form allows readers to explore, along with Adrian, the social, emotional, and physical consequences of mental compartmentalization. As one blurber put it, AFGHAN POST is "the story of a sensitive, intelligent young man as he comes to terms with conflict, privilege, duty, and ultimately himself."
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A tale inspired by the World War II Hungarian Gold Train follows the 1945 American capture of a locomotive filled with riches and the efforts of a Jewish-American lieutenant's granddaughter to track down a mysterious woman 70 years later. By the author of Red Hook Road. 60,000 first printing.
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"[Hilda's world] is . . . a glorious, exciting if also rather menacing place?one children will be eager to enter. It's also visually arresting: exuberant and lively and faintly Miyazakian."?The New York TimesHilda is sat in her tent, dwarfed by volumes of the Greater Fjords Wildlife Chronicles with a flashlight and her restless companion Twig, but Hilda's not in the fjords and it isn't raining. Hilda's pitched a tent in her room and it's been days since she's been out.In Hilda's new adventure, she meets the Nisse: a mischievous but charismatic bunch of misfits who occupy a world beside?but also somehow within?our own, and where the rules of physics don't quite match up. Meanwhile, on the streets of Trolberg, a dark specter looms . . .Prize-winning author whose previous graphic novel was in Publishers Weekly's Top 25 Children's Picture Books of 2012Hilda and the Black Hound is the fourth installment in the award-winning Hildafolk seriesOther titles in the series are consistently popular in both children's and comic book categoriesLuke Pearson is one of the leading talents of the international comics scene. He was the winner of the Young People's Comic category at the British Comic Award (2012) and was shortlisted in the Eisner Award's Best Publication for Kids and Best Writer/Artist categories (2013).
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Filled with incredibly insightful interviews that examine the relationships with fathers and mothers, this extraordinary memoir about gender and parenting follows the author as she transitioned from a man to a woman and from a father to a mother. 30,000 first printing.
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Resolving to leave the pornography industry after her husband is found electrocuted in a hot tub with another woman, an adult film star endures a reckoning involving her late husband's debts, her estranged family and the child she had to give up. By the award-winning author of the Easy Rawlins series. 40,000 first printing.
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The Painter

By Peter Heller

Our Price: $24.95
Struggling with dark impulses after serving time for attempted murder, a successful artist gives in to his obsessions to kill an abusive troublemaker before fleeing authorities and the man's vengeful clan. By the author of the best-selling The Dog Stars. 75,000 first printing.
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"It's Time To Party," the first track off of I Get Wet, opens with a rapid-fire guitar line — nothing fancy, just a couple crunchy power chords to acclimate the ears — repeated twice before a booming bass drum joins in to provide a quarter-note countdown. A faint, swirling effect intensifies with each bass kick and, by the eighth one, the ears have prepped themselves for the metal mayhem they are about to receive. When it all drops, and the joyous onslaught of a hundred guitars is finally realized, you'll have to forgive your ears for being duped into a false sense of security, because it's that second intensified drop a few seconds later — the one where yet more guitars manifest and Andrew W.K. slam-plants his vocal flag by screaming the song's titular line — that really floods the brain with endorphins, serotonin, dopamine, and whatever else formulates invincibility.Polished to a bright overdubbed-to-oblivion sheen, the party-preaching I Get Wet didn't capture the zeitgeist of rock at the turn of the century; it captured the timelessness of youth, as energized, awesome, and unapologetically stupid as ever. With insights from friends and unprecedented help from the mythological maniac himself — whose sermon and pop sensibilities continue to polarize — this book chronicles the sound's evolution, uncovers the relevance of Steev Mike, and examines how Andrew W.K.'s inviting, inclusive lyrics create the ultimate shared experience between artist and audience.
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This essential volume on Chuck Close's innovative and groundbreaking techniques presents a life's work in printmaking by one of the most influential artists of our time. Revealing the full arc of Close's career in printmaking, including his most recent work and technical achievements, this book features everything from woodcuts, Woodbury types, and anamorphic etchings to felt hand-stamp prints, pulp-paper multiples, and watercolor pigment prints. With a thorough introduction, an essay by the distinguished scholar Richard Shiff, and interviews with the artist and master printmakers, this classic study will stand as the definitive reference on Close's print practice for years to come.
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The Beats

By Gerald Stern

Our Price: $50.00
In the late 50s after an unsuccessful stint in college, master photographer Larry Fink dropped out and began an odyssey of hitchhiking through America. Starting out in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and moving on to Chicago, Larry travelled eastward through Cincinnati and finally back to his native soil on Long Island where his family waited with dismayed but open arms. Clearly Long Island was not an optimal place for young Fink to remain. Striking out on his own once again, but this time for nearby Beat mecca, New York City, Fink settled down on Minetta Lane with a chap who fancied himself a poet. Larry was quick to hit MacDougal Street where he met Turk, Mary, Bobbie, Motha, Ambrose, Randy, and Mike Stanley, not to mention Hugh Romney (a.k.a Wavy Gravy), LeRoi Jones, and so many more. Photographing, singing, and smoking weed scored in small brown paper bags on the avenues of the Village, Fink was living with internal rage, infernal optimism, and oh so many new freedoms. Just a kid, Larry yearned to get out and fight the revolution and to photograph while doing so. The crew lived all together in the sub-basement of the Sullivan Street Theatre. Being next to the Village Gate, a now legendary jazz club, they dug their way to the rear of the club brick by brick to listen to their princes of expressive freedom: John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, and Art Blakey. Fink, a Marxist and red diaper baby, didn't immediately fit in with Turk's crew, but they needed a young, drug-fueled, jazz-loving (and playing) photographer to document their visionary plight. So, it was decided that Larry sign on—they soon left New York to cross America for Mexico—in search of the soul of the Aztecs, the freedoms of the road, the compulsion of speed, the needy thrust of exaggerated adolescence. They moved fast and hysterically forward... "It was my fate to be aligned with the Beats because of my propensity for drugs, anger, and poetry. Since they were second generation, without the same sense of immortal obsession such as the like of Kerouac and Ginsberg, they had a distinct need to be documented. Perhaps that is why they tolerated me. We were not a happy marriage and got our divorce in Mexico City. The pictures, made in 1958 and 1959, come from MacDougal Street in New York City all the way down to Mexico, and on the road in America." —Larry Fink"The precocious young photographer Larry Fink chronicled a generation of poetic wanderers in the fifties with astonishing grace. The subjects in these photographs have no iPhone; they connect through guitars, typewriters, books, drums, and pens. This book confirms that Fink has always been a master at using light and line to communicate quiet yet energetic interior vistas; the ecstasy of repose." —Mitch Epstein "A beautiful and haunting harbinger—coming to us at last, though decades late. We should all hear this drum beat, now that it's finally upon us." —Lisa Kereszi "With The Beats Larry Fink proves that from the very beginning he has been a master of photographic improvisation who, with complex intuition and formal virtuosity, continues to reveal the improvisational quality of American lives." —An-My Lê
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Presents a collection of stories that explores the heartbreak and radiance of love as it is shaped by passion, betrayal, and the echoes of intimacy.
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