The Wing’s Lady Library

Curated by women, for women, featuring books by women, The Wing and The Strand have collaborated to bring you the perfect library. Strand's Books By The Foot team assembled thousands of books by female-identifying authors to live at The Wing's new Soho location in New York City.

Explore featured authors below, and visit the full library at The Wing

Nelly Bly

American journalist whose work often challenged sexism and advocated for social change. She is best known for her exposes - most notably, Ten Days In a Mad-House - and for her Jules Verne-inspired race around the world (which she made in 72 days, beating Verne's protagonist Phileas Fogg by eight days).

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Alison Bechdel

American cartoonist, best known for her autobiographical graphic novel Fun Home, which was made into a Broadway musical, and for her long-running strip Dykes to Watch Out For, which was the origin of the “Bechdel test”, a metric for measuring representation of women in media.

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Maria Ruiz de Burton

The first Mexican American writer to be published in America after the war with Mexico. The first author of this era to write in the English language, her work offers an insight into the perspective of those who were culturally Mexican but American by citizenship.

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Octavia Butler

American novelist known for blending science fiction and fantasy with African spiritualism in her work. Among other honors, she was the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Fellowship; won a Locus award, two Hugo awards, two Nebula awards; and in 2010 was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame.

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Leonora Carrington

English-born artist who was a prominent figure in the Surrealist movement. She lived in Paris and Spain before settling in Mexico; her work is known for its autobiographical and folkloric qualities.

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Rachel Carson

American writer, scientist, and ecologist who is best known for her book Silent Spring, about the detrimental affect of pesticides. Her work was instrumental in the growth of the environmental conservation movement.

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Marie Vieux Chauvet

Haitian novelist, playwright and poet who fled to New York City in the 1960s because of the dangerous reaction to her book Love, Anger, and Madness, which was perceived as an attack on the Haitian despot Duvalier. She remained exiled in New York until her death, and publication of the novel was halted until 2005.

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Angela Davis

American political activist, academic, and author. A well-known figure of the 1960s counterculture and the Civil Rights movement, she persisted in her activism even when her involvement with black power and communist groups caused her to lose her job (she got it back) and be falsely convicted.

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Jane Goodall

British ethologist and advocate for environmental conservation and the ethical treatment of animals. She is most renowned for her work observing primates,during which she discovered many previously unknown behaviors by immersing herself into the chimpanzee community and maintaining constant contact with them.

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Lorraine Hansberry

American playwright whose most famous work, A Raisin in the Sun, was the first play on Broadway by an African-American woman. She was the youngest person and first black playwright to win the New York Critics’ Circle award.

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Mary Harris Jones

Irish-born American activist and community organizer who helped found the Social Democratic Party and the Industrial Workers of the World. Her tireless work on behalf of the working class earned her the nickname “Mother Jones”.

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Maxine Hong Kingston

American author and professor who was a Guggenheim fellow, and whose work has won a National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award. As a first generation Chinese-American, her work deals with the experience of being an Asian immigrant and Asian-American in the United States.

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Janet Mock

American author, TV host, and gender rights activist. Her autobiographical work, Redefining Realness, was the first memoir written from the perspective of a trans woman to be published.

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Irène Némirovsky

A novelist of Ukrainian Jewish origin who moved to France at 16 and wrote in French. She was taken to Auschwitz in 1942, where she died soon after of typhus; her last novel, Suite Francaise, was never completed, but the first two volumes were discovered posthumously and published in 2004.

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Marjane Satrapi

Iranian artist and writer whose graphic novel Persepolis was published in France in the early 2000s. Her work deals with the culture clash between East and West, and coming of age while trying to bridge that divide.

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Shikibu Murasaki

Japanese writer and lady in the Imperial Court. Her novel, The Tale of the Genji, is not only considered a great work of Japanese literature, but thought to be the world's oldest novel.

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Sonia Sotomayor

The first Latina Supreme Court Justice in U.S. history. Prior to her nomination to the Supreme Court, Sotomayor was a U.S. District Court Judge and a judge on the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Simone Weil

French mystic, social philosopher, and activist whose work was influential on post-war English and French thought. She was also a resistance fighter during the French occupation.

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Ida B. Wells

American journalist and social reformer, best known for her anti-lynching campaign. Wells began writing articles after she was forcibly removed from a train for refusing to abide by the forced segregation of the train cars; her work later led her into political organization, where she founded the National Association of Colored Women and was a founding member of the NAACP.

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Phillis Wheatley

The first published African-American poet, who began writing poetry as an enslaved child. She was renowned in both America and England, though she ultimately died in poverty.

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