(Don't You) Forget About Me

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(Don't You) Forget About Me Young Adult - Mystery

3 out of 5 stars

(1 Reviews)

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Product Description

Traces the emotionally complex journey of a teenage girl haunted by the death of her sister and the strange, secretive power that fuels a hometown where virtually nobody ever gets sick or dies. Simultaneous eBook. 35,000 first printing.

Editorial Reviews

Even paradise has its secrets.Trains bring desperate newcomers who've heard the tales of wonder. Gardnerville has no disease, and its inhabitants live well beyond 100, looking youthful all the while. But those, like Skylar, who were born and raised in the seemingly blissful town know its dark side. The land gives many gifts, like Skylar's ability to read minds, but it takes even more. Adolescence is hard in Gardnerville, turning teens mad and even into killers. With some pharmaceutical help, Skylar has tried to forget her painful past, including her older sister Piper's strange disappearance four years ago, but now it's time to remember. In this distinctive, supernatural read, Skylar's first-person narration alternates between episodic remembrances of time spent with Piper (highlighted by '80s song titles from their mother's old mix tapes) and her current struggle to find Piper and understand the mysteries of Gardnerville. Skylar's storytelling style can be slow and complex, leaving characters and romance flat. Readers with patience and curiosity about Piper's whereabouts, possible role in an uprising and folkloric connections, however, will add up the clues that lead to a startling ending.A divisive novel that will leave readers wondering "Should I Stay or Should I Go." (Fantasy. 14-18) Copyright Kirkus 2014 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:

3 out of 5

Total Reviews: 1, Write A Review

  • Now You See Her, Now You Don't

    3 out of 5

    Written by , Posted on at 11:11:25 AM

    Shifting back and forth between timelines is evidently going to be Ms. Quinn’s writing style. Those expecting linear storytelling are going to find themselves infuriated by the author’s refusal to be bound by such rigid structure. She also has a fondness for music from the 1980s. That has significance, too. Baby boomers should not be surprised when an old 80s power ballad flows into their heads as they read. This story exhilarates and frustrates in equal measure. At first, I too was irritated by the abrupt changes in perspective (I shouldn’t have been; I encountered the exact same method in Ms. Quinn’s novel “Another Little Piece”. I was silly enough to think that was a one-time quirk.). But slowly the altering temporal storylines make sense and a more-or-less recognizable pattern emerges. The past of these people is malleable, altered by shifting perceptions that give this story a dreamlike quality, the kind where you’re certain reality is all wrong but you can’t bring yourself to wake up from it—until it turns into a nightmare that you can’t escape. The central character of Skyler is herself both dreamer and dream, as she struggles first to thrust the past from her and dig into it to search for a truth that she herself might not want. The characters try frantically to carve out a meaningful existence in a world that has lost all meaning and a town that is quietly but determinedly pulling itself apart at the seams. Ms. Quinn takes an old fairy tale and gives it an even darker and uglier twist than the original. It takes a while for that tale to show itself, buried as it is under the artful cloak she has draped around it, but the revelation is well worth the wait. This book is one that will divide its readership; readers will either love it or hate it. But, if you make it to the end, you can’t shake free from its tenacious, haunting spell.