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  • Arguments and Metaphors in Philosophy

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $63.99
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780761826774
    • Publisher: University Press of America
    • Published: March 2004
  • Chime for a Change

    By Jim Lew

    Our Price: $14.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780759651449
    • Publisher: Authorhouse
    • Published: November 2001
  • From My Heart to Yours

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $15.99
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781469154893
    • Publisher: Author Solutions
    • Published: January 2012
  • Homo Economicus: The (Lost) Prophet of Modern Times

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $12.50
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780745680125
    • Publisher: Polity
    • Published: April 2014
    An economist discusses the failure of the idea that material gain brings happiness, which has been widespread for the past two hundred years and calls for investments in other sectors, including health, education and scientific research, which really can improve lives.
  • The Encyclopedia of the Strange

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $7.50
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780880294515
    • Publisher: Dorset Press
    • Published: December 1989
  • The Economies of Rising Inequalities

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $150.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780199254026
    • Publisher: Oxford Univ Pr on Demand
    • Published: December 2002
  • The Ict Revolution

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $73.00
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780199270118
    • Publisher: Oxford Univ Pr on Demand
    • Published: March 2004
  • The Infinite Desire for Growth

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $12.50
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780691172538
    • Publisher: Princeton University Press
    • Published: June 2018
    "This erudite and opinionated book keeps readers on tenterhooks: Will humanity emerge intact from the tensions between the endless desire for growth and the economy's (and earth's) limits? Cohen's conclusion is elegant, hopeful, and controversial. An unputdownable masterpiece."--Esther Duflo, coauthor of Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty "Can modern society survive slow growth? In The Infinite Desire for Growth, Cohen presents on balance among the best and most accessible analyses of this central and very important issue. This is an interesting, forthright, and worthwhile book from an author who brings humanity to economics."--Jeff Madrick, author of Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Have Damaged America and the World "This interesting and thought-provoking book considers the question of whether humanity needs to live in a state of permanent aspiration. Its breadth of reference is remarkably impressive."--Howard Davies, author of Can Financial Markets Be Controlled?
  • The Labyrinth of the Heart

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $12.95
    • ISBN-13: 9780951385128
    • Publisher: Wood and Water
  • The Prosperity of Vice: A Worried View of Economics

    By Daniel Cohen

    Our Price: $9.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780262017305
    • Publisher: The MIT Press
    • Published: February 2012
    What happened yesterday in the West is today being repeated on a global scale.Industrial society is replacing rural society: millions of peasants in China, India, and elsewhereare leaving the countryside and going to the city. New powers are emerging and rivalries areexacerbated as competition increases for control of raw materials. Contrary to what believers in the"clash of civilizations" maintain, the great risk of the twenty-first century is not aconfrontation between cultures but a repetition of history. In The Prosperity ofVice, the influential French economist Daniel Cohen shows that violence, rather thanpeace, has been the historical accompaniment to prosperity. Peace in Europe came only after thebarbaric wars of the twentieth century, not as the outcome of economic growth. What will happen thistime for today's eagerly Westernizing emerging nations? Cohen guides us through history, describingthe European discovery of the "philosopher's stone": the possibility of perpetual growth.But the consequences of addiction to growth are dire in an era of globalization. If a billionChinese consume a billion cars, the future of the planet is threatened. But, Cohen points out, thereis another kind of globalization: the immaterial globalization enabled by the Internet. It is stillpossible, he argues, that the cyber-world will create a new awareness of global solidarity. It evenmay help us accomplish a formidable cognitive task, as immense as that realized during theIndustrial Revolution--one that would allow us learn to live within the limits of a solitaryplanet.

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