View:

  • Fortune's Faces: The Roman De La Rose and the Poetics of Contingency

    By Daniel Heller-Roazen

    Our Price: $50.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780801871917
    • Publisher: JOHNS HOPKINS UP
    • Published: September 2003
    Shows how the thirteenth-century work invokes & radicalizes two classical & medieval traditions of reflection on language & contingency: that of the Provencal, French, & Italian love poets, who sought to compose their 'verses of pure nothing' in a language Dante described as 'without grammar,' & that of Aristotle's discussion of 'future contingents' as it was received & refined in the logic, physics, theology, & epistemology of Boethius, Abelard, Albert the Great, & Thomas Aquinas.
  • Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life

    By Giorgio Agamben

    Our Price: $24.00
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780804732185
    • Publisher: Stanford University Press
    • Published: April 1998
    One of Italy's most original philosophers aims to connect the problem of pure possibility, potentiality, and power with the problem of political and social ethics in a context where the latter has lost its previous religious, metaphysical, and cultural grounding.
  • Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy

    By Giorgio Agamben

    Our Price: $32.00
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780804732789
    • Publisher: Stanford University Press
    • Published: January 2000
    This book collects fifteen major philosophical essays written over a period of more than twenty years by acclaimed Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben. The volume opens with an introduction in which the editor situates Agamben's work with respect to both the history of philosophy and contemporary European thought. The essays that follow articulate a series of theoretical confrontations with privileged figures in the history of philosophy, politics, and criticism, from Plato to Spinoza, Aristotle to Deleuze, Carl Schmitt to Benjamin, Hegel to Aby Warburg, and Heidegger to Derrida. Three fundamental concepts organize the collection as a whole: language, in the sense not of particular statements but rather the very taking place of speech, the pure fact of language's existence; history, as it appears from a perspective in which tradition, transmission, and memory reach their messianic fulfillment; and potentiality, understood as a fundamental problem of metaphysics, ethics, and the philosophy of language. All these topics converge in the final part of the book, in which Agamben offers an extensive reading of Melville's short story "Bartleby the Scrivener" as a work that puts potentiality and actuality, possibility and reality, in an altogether new light.
  • Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive

    By Giorgio Agamben

    Our Price: $21.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781890951177
    • Publisher: Zone Books
    • Published: January 2002
    In this book the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben looks closely at the literature of the survivors of Auschwitz, probing the philosophical and ethical questions raised by their testimony."In its form, this book is a kind of perpetual commentary on testimony. It did not seem possible to proceed otherwise. At a certain point, it became clear that testimony contained at its core an essential lacuna; in other words, the survivors bore witness to something it is impossible to bear witness to. As a consequence, commenting on survivors' testimony necessarily meant interrogating this lacuna or, more precisely, attempting to listen to it. Listening to something absent did not prove fruitless work for this author. Above all, it made it necessary to clear away almost all the doctrines that, since Auschwitz, have been advanced in the name of ethics."--Giorgio Agamben
  • The Arabian Nights (Norton Critical Editions)

    By Daniel Heller-Roazen

    Our Price: $23.75
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780393928082
    • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
    • Published: 2010
    Few works of literature are as familiar and beloved as The Arabian Nights. Yet few remain also as unknown. In English, The Arabian Nights is a literary work of relatively recent date—the first versions of the tales appeared in English barely two hundred years ago. The tales are accompanied by a preface, a note on the text, and explanatory annotations.“Contexts” presents three of the oldest witnesses to The Arabian Nights in the Arabic tradition, together in English for the first time: an anonymous ninth-century fragment, Al Mas'udi's Muruj al-Dhahab, and Ibn al-Nadim's The Fihrist. Also included are three related works by the nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers Edgar Allan Poe, Marcel Proust, and Taha Husayn.“Criticism” collects eleven wide-ranging essays on The Arabian Nights' central themes by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Josef Horovitz, Jorge Luis Borges, Francesco Gabrieli, Mia Irene Gerhardt, Tzvetan Todorov, Andras Hamori, Heinz Grotzfield, Jerome W. Clinton, Abdelfattah Kilito, and David Pinault.A Chronology of The Arabian Nights and a Selected Bibliography are also included.
  • The End of the Poem: Studies in Poetics

    By Giorgio Agamben

    Our Price: $22.00
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780804730228
    • Publisher: Stanford University Press
    • Published: June 1999
    This book, by one of Italy's most important and original contemporary philosophers, represents a broad, general, and ambitious undertaking--nothing less than an attempt to rethink the nature of poetic language and to rearticulate relationships among theology, poetry, and philosophy in a tradition of literature initiated by Dante.The author presents "literature" as a set of formal or linguistic genres that discuss or develop theological issues at a certain distance from the discourse of theology. This distance begins to appear in Virgil and Ovid, but it becomes decisive in Dante and in his decision to write in the vernacular. His vernacular Italian reaches back through classical allusion to the Latin that was in his day the language of theology, but it does so with a difference. It is no accident that in the Commedia Virgil is Dante's guide.The book opens with a discussion of just how Dante's poem is a "comedy," and it concludes with a discussion of the "ends of poetry" in a variety of senses: enjambment at the ends of lines, the concluding lines of poems, and the end of poetry as a mode of writing this sort of literature. Of course, to have poetry "end" does not mean that people stop writing it, but that literature passes into a period in which it is concerned with its own ending, with its own bounds and limits, historical and otherwise.Though most of the essays make specific reference to various authors of the Italian literary tradition (including Dante, Polifilo, Pascoli, Delfini, and Caproni), they transcend the confines of Italian literature and engage several other literary and philosophical authors (Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Boethius, the Provencal poets, Mallarme, and Holderlin, among others).

View: