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  • Detective Story

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $13.95
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780307279651
    • Publisher: Vintage
    • Published: March 2009
    From Nobel laureate Imre Kertesz comes this riveting novel about a torturer for the secret police of a Latin American regime who tells the haunting story of the father and son he ensnared and destroyed. A simple, explosive novel of justice railroaded by malevolence. 112p.
  • Fatelessness

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $8.00 - $14.35
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781400078639
    • Publisher: Vintage Books
    • Published: December 2004
    The genius of this unblinking, unflinching novel lies in its refusal to mitigate the unfathomable aliveness of the Holocaust. This work by the 2002 Nobel Prize for Literature recipient,may, in the annals of this genre, be surpassed only by Primo Levi's 'Survival in Auschwitz.' Fourteen-year-old Georg Koves, plucked from his home in Budapest and deposited on a train to Auschwitz, unable to identify with other Jews and in turn rejected by them, Georg is the essential outsider. Yet his estrangement makes him a preternaturally accurate observer. 'Sardonic, evocative, and all the more horrifying for its rigorous avoidance of sentiment.' 256p.
  • Kaddish for a Child Not Born

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $125.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9789111910200
    • Publisher: Hydra Books
    • Published: 1997
    (1997). 8vo. 1st edition. Light edgewear to boards. Small bump to head of spine. Minor edgewear to dust jacket. VG/VG.
  • Kaddish for a Child Not Born

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $7.50
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9780810111615
    • Publisher: Northwestern University Press
    • Published: January 1997
    This novel by the 2002 Nobel Prize for Literature recipient is a mesmerizing tale of identity and memory - the story of a middle-aged man taking stock of his life in the ever-present shadow of the Holocaust. It unfolds at a writers' retreat as the narrator, a Holocaust survivor, explains to a friend that he cannot bear children into this world where the Holocaust occurred and could occur again. An intricatenarrative reveals his myriad disappointments, from his unsuccessful literary career to his failed marriage and his ex-wife's new family and...children. 95p. Pap.
  • Kaddish for an Unborn Child

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $5.95 - $6.00
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781400078622
    • Publisher: VINTAGE BOOKS
    • Published: November 2004
    The first word in this mesmerizing novel is 'No.' It is how the novel's narrator, a middle-aged Hungarian-Jewish writer, answers an acquaintance who asks him if he has a child. It is the answer he gave hiswife (now ex-wife) years earlier when she told him that she wanted one. The loss, longing, and regret that haunt the years between these two 'nos' give rise to one of the most eloquent meditations ever written on the Holocaust.
  • Kaddish pour l'enfant qui ne naitra pas (French Edition)

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $7.50
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9782742703128
    • Publisher: Actes Sud
    • Published: January 1995
  • Sensorteco

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $19.95
    • ISBN-13: 9781595693761
    • Publisher: MONDIAL
  • The Holocaust as Culture: A Conversation with Imre Kertesz

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $15.00
    • Format: Hardcover
    • ISBN-13: 9780857420220
    • Publisher: Seagull Books
    • Published: May 2012
    Hungarian Imre Kertész was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2002 for “writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history.” His conversation with literary historian Thomas Cooper that is presented here speaks specifically to this relationship between the personal and the historical.   In The Holocaust as Culture,Kertész recalls his childhood in Buchenwald and Auschwitz and as a writer living under the so-called soft dictatorship of communist Hungary. Reflecting on his experiences of the Holocaust and the Soviet occupation of Hungary following World War II, Kertész likens the ideological machinery of National Socialism to the oppressive routines of life under communism. He also discusses the complex publication history of Fateless, his acclaimed novel about the experiences of a Hungarian child deported to Auschwitz, and the lack of interest with which it was initially met in Hungary due to its failure to conform to the communist government's simplistic history of the relationship between Nazi occupiers and communist liberators. The underlying theme in the dialogue between Kertész and Cooper is the difficulty of mediating the past and creating models for interpreting history, and how this challenges ideas of self.  The title The Holocaust as Culture is taken from that of a talk Kertész gave in Vienna for a symposium on the life and works of Jean Améry. That essay is included here, and it reflects on Améry's fear that history would all too quickly forget the fates of the victims of the concentration camps. Combined with an introduction by Thomas Cooper, the thoughts gathered here reveal Kertész's views on the lengthening shadow of the Holocaust as an ever-present part of the world's cultural memory and his idea of the crucial functions of literature and art as the vessels of this memory.
  • The Pathseeker

    By Imre Kertesz

    Our Price: $6.50
    • Format: Paperback
    • ISBN-13: 9781933633534
    • Publisher: Melville House
    • Published: April 2008
    In this major work of fiction, Nobel Prize-winner Imre Kertesz continues his investigation of the malignant metholdogies of totalitarianism. In a mystgerious middle-European country, a man identified only as 'The Commissioner' undertakes what seems to be a banal trip to a nondescript town with his wife - abrief detour on the way to a holiday at the seaside - that turns into something ominous. Something terrible has happened in the town. Something that no one wants to discuss. With his wife watching fearfully, he commences a perverse investigation, rudely interrogating the locals, inspecting a local ladmark with frightening intensity. Uncovering the past.

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